A Place Like No Other

Step Away from the ordinary and discover the unexpected…

Historic river towns offer great shopping, dining and accommodations

The historic small towns that dot the river-front and countryside offer a variety of activities for all ages and interests. Start your exploration of the Valley in the South, where the St. Croix meets the mighty Mississippi then traverse your way up one of the scenic state highways or county roads that lead to quaint small towns, pristine parks, artist’s studios, galleries, antique shops, wonderful restaurants or local cafés. Your visit may include staying at a cozy bed and breakfast, pampering yourself at a spa, or shopping for antiques or gifts at one of the valley’s scores of fine shops and galleries.

The St Croix River Valley offers spectacular scenery and is a nature lovers dream

Outdoor enthusiasts can enjoy bald eagles soaring between rugged cliffs and rock formations on the Upper St. Croix, meadows of wildflowers dancing in the wind, quiet landscapes, beautiful vistas, and wildlife viewing from roadways, waterways, railways and trails. In winter, take in the Hudson’s Hot Air Affair hot air balloon festival, traverse the snowy landscape via skis, snowshoes, snowmobiles, dogsled or spend the day skiing at one of the valley’s ski resorts.

The scenic St. Croix valley is an ideal place to find respite from everyday living. Enjoy the events and attractions as thousands of others have. Your choices are many – just follow the river.

National Scenic Riverway

The Saint Croix National Scenic Riverway is a federally protected system of riverways located in eastern Minnesota and northwestern Wisconsin and includes both the St. Croix and Namekagon rivers, offering 255 miles of clean water flowing through pristine landscape.

One of the most peaceful ways to experience Minnesota and Wisconsin’s fall color show is paddling a canoe or kayak between the densely wooded banks of the St. Croix or Namekagon rivers.  Much of the 164-mile St. Croix river forms the border between Minnesota and Wisconsin, and it was one of only eight waterways originally designated as a “National Wild and Scenic River” by the federal government, in 1968.